Tag Archives: T&L

T&L Hubs 2014-2015 – Effective Feedback Part 2

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Monday’s training Day saw part 2 of our journey on improving feedback at THW. As a school we have worked hard on ensuring that the feedback that we give to students is of high quality and moves them on with their learning.

effective feedback at THW 1 effective feedback at THW 2

Our next step is now to focus on student response. Indeed, “we can spend every hour god sends slavishly marking, but if we do not give students an equally significant amount of time to reflect and respond to such feedback then our time becomes rather pointless! In the long term, students will understand the purpose of our written feedback if they understand how they can and why they should respond to it. If students see and feel the improvements to be gained from drafting and responding to feedback then our marking time will have a transformative value.”

Have a look at the 2 attachments for some practical ideas which will help you make sure that feedback is more work for the recipient than the donor!

practical ideas better-marking-strategies     T&L Hub Meeting Effective Feedback

 

THW TeachMeet – CPD

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teachmeet logo

Our first TeachMeet CPD was dedicated to literacy. Many thanks to all staff who shared an idea.

Jess – spellings with tutor groups : students who struggle with learning spellings could learn 5 instead of 10 / challenge pupils to pick 2 words out of the list and use them in a sentence. Jess also shared how she has used a spreadsheet to record her tutees’ scores and how this has helped her to create some competition within her form group. Template Spelling Results with class average and pupil weekly average

Becky – literacy starters : which one is the odd one out? (have multiple answers to promote discussion) / boggle / sort words into categories Quick literacy starters

Chris – 4 corners : 4 words on the board, one in each corner. Students make a sentence with it. For example in maths,

4 Corners

printed prompts for 2 stars and a wish to ensure pupils give better feedback to their peers & literacy mats to reinforce subject specific vocabulary Music Key Words Final

Deb – 7 Monkeys example

definitions:

  • Pupils come up with their own definitions of key words
  • Compare with another pupils
  • Come up with a definitive definition
  • Be able to justify why their definition is the best one within a group

“think outside the box”:

  • Read back through work/passage/information
  • Link to an analogy/real life context/draw a picture or sequence of pictures to represent
  • Explain their drawings to partner/class/group depending on activity.

Ana – scaffolding writing: 1 / mind map key vocabulary (for example in French opinions / connectives / quantifiers) 2/ give pupils more vocab to add to their mind map 3/ always use the mind map as a tool box to improve quality of writing & speaking. 4/ write in a triangle as a way as building up a quality answer. 5/ when pupils have used words from their mind map enough times, they can highlight them on their mind map in order to show that they are confident with them. 6/ they can then focus on new vocabulary.

pyramid

Merun – literacy games COUNTDOWN  UNO card game present tense irregular verbs

Use http://www.teachit.co.uk (under the “whizzy things” tab) and http://www.classtools.net for more literacy games and templates.

– definitions to match up with words as a way of expanding pupils’ range of vocabulary Hay que estudiar sobre los tiempos pasados y sobre las guerras y las personas famosas de antes subject names

Rute – using a template to encourage KS5 students to take better notes during lessons

Claire – “fun fan” to practise accuracy in spellings Fun Fan hola vocab cabin crew dialogue

– using a checklist to ensure students produce complex and sophisticated pieces of writing checklist write an answer likes and dislikes

– using animations on Word to focus pupils’ attention to particular aspects of literacy Blinking background and Las Vegas lights

– literacy plasters to save time correcting some of the most common mistakes! French literacy plastersFrench literacy plasters (2) French literacy plasters (3)  literacy plasters 1 literacy plasters 2

Thanks for a great session. Please let us know if you have tried any of the ideas shared after the TeachMeet.

 

Exam Revision Technique

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My year 12 lesson today for exam revision:

I broke down their food anthology (exam texts) into themes and asked the pupils to make figures out of playdoh of what helped them best to remember their particular chosen text. They then had to talk through and justify why they had created the shape in such a way.

Then, they had to link their idea to a particular theme and physically place it on a piece of paper with the theme attached and explain why they had placed it there.

It seemed to work really well!

It linked into their exam practice, and how they need to think about a theme and how they can link it into the exam question, rather than just shoe-horning a text they like into a theme.

Becca

playdoh 2

The Learning Environment – Focus Group

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As part of the Learning Environment Focus Group we have spent time over the last 2 terms reviewing our use of display areas and worked on improving the use of display to impact on T&L.

We have looked at the following areas:

improving the subject specific displays in classrooms to support T&L (we are using areas outside of classrooms to display pupils’ work, mainly corridors)

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engaging students in learning via reflection/evaluation boards

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improving questioning to link the learning environment and the Mike Hughes CPD

iqd

promoting our subject area

psd2psd

celebrating our work

cwd

Spotlight Display

It’s all about learning – CPD

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Key points:
• Numbers
• Distance
• Depth

  1. The effective teacher is flexible/adaptable/responds to what students are achieving and moves learning forward intuitively.
  2. Students receive information, are given the opportunity to process this information and then apply it through challenging activities.
  3. Consider the balance of student talk vs teacher talk.
  4. If students are ready, don’t be afraid to move on.
  5. Use their answers to questions to ascertain their understanding of prior learning, then move on at a pace that suits what the learners can do.
  6. In practical subjects ensure students are aware of the big picture in terms of end ‘product’ and skills. Provide written support/prompt sheets if necessary. Ensure during ‘release time’ that students know what they have to do to do so but more importantly ensure that they are thinking/getting better/moving forwards in their learning & skills. Use intervention appropriately, don’t intervene unnecessarily, use intervention to change the direction of learning and to facilitate momentum and rhythm to the lesson. How will students show what has changed during the lesson/independent work – how is this made audible/visible?
  7. Allow for mistakes to be made then deconstruct to move learning forwards. Make learning challenging – get students to think to remove the opportunity to be passive (link here to inset with Mike Hughes). Give students time to reflect and refine – avoid unnatural time limitations that impinge on learning.
  8. Consider how objectives are set to ensure student ownership/student buy in – impact of this stage of the lesson – if learning is ongoing, how might the setting of objectives reflect this?

It’s all about learning It’s all about learning CPD

Key Stage 5 T&L Strategies – CPD

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This CPD session was a follow-up to the WCSF training we had at the end of last year and looked at taking some tips further to positively impact on the T&L of low ability learners at KS5.

The following strategies were shared:

– Comment-only marking: minimum input – maximum impact!

The amount of marking at KS5 is often very heavy yet so important in helping students understand how to improve. In particular, marking essays  and writing detailed feedback can take forever! Here’s one simple way to remedy this whilst ensuring that students get the guidance they need to further improve.

1.Students list features of good/weak essays
2.Turn comments into ‘codes’
3.Use ‘codes’ to mark
4.Students re-write one passage in class
comment only markingcomment only marking 2comment only marking 3
Here’s another example developed by the MFL department after the session 2 stars and a wish AS writing Marking Grid
– Making connections:
This activity is based on the principle that if students have to do something with information (ie, reduce, connect, assemble, sequence it), then their understanding deepens.
6 of separation
Six degrees of separation is the theory that anyone on the planet can be connected to any other person on the planet through a chain of acquaintances that has no more than five intermediaries. The game “Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon” was invented as a play on the concept: the goal is to link any actor to Kevin Bacon through no more than six connections, where two actors are connected if they have appeared in a movie or commercial together.
– Retention, Analysis & Evaluation:
For some of our weaker students, remembering subject specific content itself can be a challenge. Try the following to boost their subject knowledge:
* ask students to keep a glossary of key terms
* encourage students to underline key terms in their work
* encourage students to “do something” with the information they take in (highlight something surprising… / highlight something interesting… / highlight something you agree with… / highlight something you disagree with… / highlight something you do not understand…)
* use post-it notes as a recap
* use quizzes or games to revise subject knowledge (see templates below)
To help with the skills of analysis and evaluation, give them examples, vocabulary and writing frames.
– Peer-assessment:
The following prompts can be really nice not only to give peer-assessment a bit of a makeover from the traditional 2 stars and a wish but also to refine and improve pupils’ learning.
* Write down four key words that your partner has used. Suggest one word that they could have used but didn’t.
* Write down the best sentence/quote from their work and explain why you chose it (ie what is good about it?).
* Write down one sentence/quote that doesn’t make sense to you (ie it lacks clarity or isn’t fully explained).
* Add one sentence which improves the essay.